1MDB-linked superyacht Equanimity renamed Tranquility after sale to Genting, docked in Singapore

   The superyacht was one of many luxury items seized by the Malaysian government as part of its probe into money laundering involving the 1Malaysia Development Berhad state fund.
The superyacht was one of many luxury items seized by the Malaysian government as part of its probe into money laundering involving the 1Malaysia Development Berhad state fund.PHOTO: REUTERS

PETALING JAYA (THE STAR/ASIA NEWS NETWORK) - The superyacht Equanimity has been renamed Tranquility, according to the ship-tracking website Marine Traffic.

The superyacht was one of many luxury items seized by the Malaysian government as part of its probe into money laundering involving the 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB) state fund.

Once owned by fugitive businessman Low Taek Jho, or better known as Jho Low, it was reported that Equanimity was built for US$250 million (S$340 million).

Marine Traffic stated that the vessel's name, as reported by the automatic identification system (AIS), is now Tranquility instead of Equanimity.

The name is being transmitted by the AIS, an automatic tracking system that uses transponders on ships.

It was announced earlier this month that the vessel was sold to Genting Malaysia Bhd for US$126 million (S$170 million) and is currently docked in Singapore.

Genting said in an announcement on the sale posted on Bursa Malaysia's website the acquisition will provide the company with "a unique and competitive edge for its premium customers business".

 
 
 

Genting Malaysia is part of the Genting Group whose businesses include casino operations in Genting Highlands in Malaysia and Sentosa Island in Singapore.

Equanimity was seized off Bali's coast by Indonesia in February last year at the request of the US authorities as part of a multibillion-dollar corruption investigation into the 1MDB scandal.

The luxury vessel was said to have an interior clad in marble and gold leaf, a spa and sauna, a 20m swimming pool, a movie theatre and helipad.

The Indonesian government handed over the vessel to Malaysia in August last year but the Malaysian government struggled to find buyers for the 91m ship after an earlier auction failed until the sale to Genting this month.

The government had spent RM14.5 million (S$4.8 million) to maintain Equanimity, which was docked in Port Klang before it was moved to the Royal Malaysian Navy's Region 3 headquarters in Langkawi, according to Malaysian media.

Low, who has also denied any wrongdoing, remains at large. He faces charges in Malaysia including money laundering.