40% of inmates released reoffend in 5 years

Ms Shanti Pandian, director of Community Action for the Rehabilitation of Ex-offenders Network; Singapore Prison Service Superintendent Faisal Mustaffa of Institution B4; and Mr Andrew Tay, executive director of Prison Fellowship Singapore, at a semi
Ms Shanti Pandian, director of Community Action for the Rehabilitation of Ex-offenders Network; Singapore Prison Service Superintendent Faisal Mustaffa of Institution B4; and Mr Andrew Tay, executive director of Prison Fellowship Singapore, at a seminar yesterday on aftercare efforts for former inmates, held at Fairmont Singapore hotel. ST PHOTO: GAVIN FOO

Shanmugam says figure, a slight dip from previous years, is cause for concern

About 40 per cent of offenders released in 2013 returned to prison within five years, it was revealed yesterday, with Law and Home Affairs Minister K. Shanmugam calling the figure a "cause for concern".

While noting that Singapore's overall recidivism rate is better than that of many other countries', the minister, speaking at a seminar on aftercare efforts for former offenders, said there is room for improvement.

According to additional statistics released to The Straits Times by the Singapore Prison Service (SPS), the five-year recidivism rate saw a slight dip for inmates who were released in 2013, compared with the previous two cohorts.

Of the inmates released in 2013, 41 per cent reoffended within five years, down from 43 per cent for offenders released in 2011 and 2012.

Mr Shanmugam said inmates who are released often find themselves without the social support needed to reintegrate into society, and may face family troubles as well as difficulty in finding jobs.

Apart from rehabilitating offenders during their time in prison, he said, there are two other important periods of intervention: before the crime is committed, and after the inmate is released.

He said there are predictive tools that can indicate those who are likely to offend so that help can be given before they turn to crime.

In addition, when inmates are released from prison, support from the Government, partner agencies and organisations, as well as the community, can reduce the likelihood of recidivism.

 
 
 
 

Highlighting the work of partners in the Community Action for the Rehabilitation of Ex-offenders Network, headed by Ms Shanti Pandian, and the SPS, the minister said religious groups have played an important role in reintegrating former offenders.

For example, if an inmate receiving religious counselling from the Prison Fellowship Singapore (PFS) is going to be released, the Christian group will match him to a suitable church community. If required, the group will also have people ready to meet the inmate at the prison gate when he is released.

Mr Shanmugam also cited the Fitrah office, set up by the Islamic Religious Council of Singapore, which provides support for inmates and their families through programmes, financial assistance and befriending services.

Such inmates will receive a package containing an information kit, grocery vouchers and an ez-link card before they are released.

"For an offender leaving prison, these things can make a huge difference," said Mr Shanmugam.

Currently, SPS works with 12 religious voluntary welfare organisations, with about 1,200 volunteers from the major faiths.

While former offenders have individual responsibility in recidivism, the support from the people around them counts too, said SPS Superintendent Faisal Mustaffa of Institution B4.

Agreeing, PFS executive director Andrew Tay said: "This is a journey for them and not an easy one."

"What we believe in is to build a village around each ex-offender. You can tell them or coerce them to change, and they might, but it will be to a limited effect. You need something from within themselves to want to change, and so that sense of community is very important," he added.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 29, 2019, with the headline '40% of inmates released reoffend in 5 years'. Print Edition | Subscribe