Second RSAF aircraft arrives in Laos with relief aid for flood victims


Personnel from the Singapore Combat Engineers and Army Deployment Force teaching Lao People's Army personnel how to use the dinghies for water rescue operations.
Personnel from the Singapore Combat Engineers and Army Deployment Force teaching Lao People's Army personnel how to use the dinghies for water rescue operations.PHOTO: FACEBOOK/MINDEF

SINGAPORE - The second of two Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) C-130 transport planes arrived in Laos on Friday (July 27) with supplies for flood victims.

In a Facebook post, the Ministry of Defence (Mindef) said that a 19-strong contingent of Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) and Singapore Civil Defence Force (SCDF) personnel arrived in Laos at 11.10am.

The supplies will provide relief to displaced civilians affected by flash floods arising from the collapse of the Xe Pian-Xe Namnoy dam in Attapeu province on Monday.

On Thursday night, the first C-130 plane, also carrying a 19-strong crew, arrived in Laos.

The two planes carried humanitarian supplies with a combined value of about $280,000, including tents, meal rations, bottled water, medical supplies and five rubber dinghies with outboard motors donated by the SAF.

The supplies were handed to Laos Vice-Minister of Labour and Social Welfare Baykham Khattiya by Singapore's Ambassador in Vientiane, Mr Dominic Goh, and SAF Mission Commander, Colonel Mohd Fahmi Aliman.

On Friday, personnel from the Singapore Combat Engineers and Army Deployment Force helped to teach Lao People's Army personnel how to use the dinghies for water rescue operations and set up five-man tents for temporary shelter.

SCDF officers also delivered 11 large modular field tents.

In a statement on Wednesday, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs said the Singapore Government had pledged US$100,000 (S$136,000) as seed money to kick-start a public fund-raising appeal by the Singapore Red Cross.

 

On Thursday, state media reported that 27 people were confirmed dead and 131 missing in Attapeu, which borders Vietnam to the east and Cambodia to the south.

More than 3,000 - some of whom have clung to safety for the past three days on the zinc roofs of submerged homes - are reportedly still waiting to be rescued.

Thousands of Cambodians living along the banks of the Sekong River were also evacuated as a result of the floods.