John Lui Film Correspondent recommends

Film Picks: Mexican Film Festival

I Dream In Another Language
I Dream In Another LanguagePHOTO: MEXICAN FILM FESTIVAL
Boys Cry
Boys CryPHOTO: ITALIAN FILM FESTIVAL
Always Be My Maybe
Always Be My MaybePHOTO: NETFLIX

MEXICAN FILM FESTIVAL

In the romantic drama I Dream In Another Language (R21, 2017, 103 minutes), an indigenous language is almost extinct, but the two old men who are its last speakers have not spoken to each other in 50 years. As young men, they had both loved the same woman and cannot let go of their mutual hatred.

When a linguist tries to mend fences for the sake of research, he discovers there is more to the language than he thought possible.

This work is a Grand Jury Prize nominee and Audience Award winner at the Sundance Film Festival in the World Cinema Dramatic category.

WHERE/MRT: The Projector, Level 5 Golden Mile Tower 6001 Beach Road (Nicoll Highway); NUS Shaw Foundation Alumni House, 11 Kent Ridge Drive (Kent Ridge/Dover) WHEN: The Projector, till tomorrow; NUS Shaw Foundation Alumni House, Monday to Wednesday ADMISSION: $13.50 at The Projector; complimentary at NUS Shaw Foundation Alumni House INFO: theprojector.sg/category/mexican-film-festival-2019; www.alumnet.events/MFF19


ITALIAN FILM FESTIVAL

The closing film of the festival is Boys Cry (R21, 2018, 91 minutes), a hard-edged crime drama about two men, Mirko and Manolo, who deliver pizzas in Rome while dreaming of a better life.

A traffic accident brings them to the attention of local mobsters, and with it the promise of a new life – if they can handle the consequences.

WHERE: GV Plaza, Plaza Singapura MRT: Dhoby Ghaut WHEN: Today ADMISSION: $13.50 INFO: www.ambsingapore.esteri.it or gv.com.sg


ALWAYS BE MY MAYBE (PG13)

102 minutes/showing on Netflix/3.5 stars

Fans of comic Ali Wong’s Netflix standup shows Baby Cobra (2016) and Hard Knock Wife (2018) might be wishing hard for this movie to carry the same raucously vulgar energy.

This is not that movie, but what it lacks in raunch, it makes up for in easygoing charm.

Sasha Tran and Marcus Kim (played by Wong and Randall Park) are best friends as children. But after Marcus’ mother dies, things change between them and a botched attempt at intimacy leads to their estrangement.

Fifteen years pass. Sasha, now a celebrity chef, reconnects with Marcus, who is an air-conditioner technician and struggling musician.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 07, 2019, with the headline 'Film Picks'. Print Edition | Subscribe