Kids make murukku and learn about Indian culture

In the Indian Heritage Centre's "Little Indian Chefs!" Heritage Hunt, children aged five to 12 will go on a learning journey around Little India.
In the Indian Heritage Centre's "Little Indian Chefs!" Heritage Hunt, children aged five to 12 will go on a learning journey around Little India.PHOTO: INDIAN HERITAGE CENTRE

This week, children aged five to 12 will get the chance to flip their own prata and make their own murukku as part of the Indian Heritage Centre's (IHC) "Little Indian Chefs!" Heritage Hunt.

Held tomorrow and on Saturday as part of the National Heritage Board's Children's Season, the fourth edition of the IHC's annual Heritage Hunt will take young ones on a learning journey around the Little India precinct to learn about Indian cuisine and meet foodstall owners, including vegetable sellers and sweets chefs.

Ms Siti Asmah, 30, manager of education and outreach at the IHC, says: "This year, we have decided to partner Little India's foodstall owners so that participants can try their hand at making Indian dishes and snacks, an opportunity they are unlikely to get in their classrooms."

  • BOOK IT /"LITTLE INDIAN CHEFS!" - HERITAGE HUNT @ IHC

  • WHERE: Indian Heritage Centre, 5 Campbell Lane

    WHEN: Tomorrow and Saturday, various sessions from 10am to 1pm

    ADMISSION: Free

    INFO: ihcprogrammes.peatix.com

The participants will also get to snack on traditional Indian treats such as laddoo, a sweet made of flour, and learn about different types of vegetables used in Indian cooking.

Several stall owners will also pitch in to share their knowledge about the origins of the food they sell and the significance of the snacks and dishes in Indian culture.

"We have always partnered the shop owners of Little India for the IHC's Heritage Hunts because they are regular and enthusiastic programme partners, and they serve as authentic learning resources for our children's programmes," adds Ms Siti.

The 11/2-hour session will be conducted by students from ITE College West, who will serve as station masters and facilitators.

The students will also inform participants about the importance of various foods in Indian culture and their symbolic meanings, such as how the banana leaf represents prosperity and fertility.

Ms Siti says: "We hope participants will learn more about and experience Indian heritage and culture in a fun and engaging manner."

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 11, 2019, with the headline 'Kids make murukku and learn about Indian culture'. Print Edition | Subscribe