MOM warns of fake employment pass application website

The fake website prompts users to check the status of their employment pass applications, with fields for them to enter their names and other personal details.
The fake website prompts users to check the status of their employment pass applications, with fields for them to enter their names and other personal details.PHOTO: SCREENGRAB

SINGAPORE - The Ministry of Manpower (MOM) has warned members of the public of yet another fake website that is pretending to be the ministry and duping users into providing their personal information.

In a Facebook post on Tuesday (Aug 27), the ministry identified the fake website (http://eponlinemom-sg.com).

The link leads to a website that prompts users to check the status of their employment pass applications. It also contains fields for them to enter their names and other personal details.

The MOM advises members of the public to use only the official MOM website at www.mom.gov.sg for information and transactions related to the ministry.

"We will continue to monitor for fake 'MOM' websites and work to bring them down. We also remain committed to keeping the official MOM website unaffected and your data safe," it wrote in the post.

The ministry's latest warning comes amid a spate in online scams, impersonations and websites passing themselves off as the Singapore Government and news organisations.

Earlier this month, the MOM warned the public about a message circulating on WhatsApp that said workers can claim $2,800 from the Government.

The message claimed that "those who worked between 1990 and 2019 have the right to withdraw $2,800" from the Singapore Government.

It also has a link to a fake Government website.

 
 
 

In a separate incident last Tuesday (Aug 20), the Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore issued an advisory on its Facebook page and website alerting the public to a tax refund scam spreading on WhatsApp.

The public was advised to avoid responding to or circulating the scam e-mail with the header "Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore-Refund-Online-Confirmation".

The scam e-mail included the taxman's official logo and instructed the receiver to download, complete and submit a tax refund form from a link provided.


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