5 more infants may have taken contaminated Dumex milk formula: KKH

The infants might have taken milk from a recalled batch of Dumex's Stage 1 Mamil Gold Infant Milk Formula.
The infants might have taken milk from a recalled batch of Dumex's Stage 1 Mamil Gold Infant Milk Formula.PHOTO: AVA

SINGAPORE - Five more babies might have been fed infant formula milk potentially contaminated with bacteria, the KK Women's and Children's Hospital (KKH) said on Thursday evening (Aug 30).

The infants might have taken milk from a recalled batch of Dumex's Stage 1 Mamil Gold Infant Milk Formula, KKH said in an update.

They were identified after the hospital did additional checks on records of all patients admitted to the hospitals.

KKH said it has contacted the caregivers of the five infants as an added precautionary measure, and found that they are currently well.

Associate Professor Ng Kee Chong, chairman of the medical board at KKH, said: "The health and safety of our patients is always our primary concern.

"We will continue to closely monitor the situation and our team of specialists is on standby to provide care and support."

KKH had said last Thursday that 13 infants were suspected to have been given the implicated formula milk. Twelve of them are confirmed to be well.

 
 
 

A spokesman for the National University Hospital also said last week that one patient might have been fed the tainted milk. The infant's caregiver has been advised to monitor his child's condition and seek treatment if symptoms develop.

The Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority (AVA) on Aug 20 announced the recall of the affected Dumex milk formula, after the Cronobacter sakazakii bacteria was found in test samples.

The batch of 4,200 tins imported from Malaysia, which has been on sale islandwide since January, was recalled after samples tested positive for the bacteria.

While rare, infections from the bacterium - which can survive dry conditions, such as in dry food like powdered milk - can be fatal to newborns, as it can cause meningitis or sepsis.

Infants with the Cronobacter infection, which can be treated with antibiotics, may show symptoms such as fever, poor feeding or lethargy, though no cases have been reported so far.