Law firms give back in different ways, through education, charity and pro bono work

Adsan Law is both focused in its approach and diverse in its outreach. PHOTO: ADSAN LAW

SINGAPORE - For the third year running, Adsan Law took pole position in the Charities, Not-for-profit Associations and Pro Bono category of The Straits Times Singapore’s Best Law Firms rankings, beating heavyweights like Dentons Rodyk, Rajah & Tann, and Allen & Gledhill.

Among other ongoing activities in this field, the firm initiated the Adsan Troopers, comprising staff volunteers who are given paid leave to help organise activities for charitable homes.

Adsan Law is both focused in its approach and diverse in its outreach. It advises and assists charities, foundations, non-profit organisations, associations and societies in the areas of charity law, compliance, governance structure and restructuring, as well as on the setting up of charities and institutions of public character. It also organises virtual talks, seminars and training sessions to help charities and non-profit organisations.

Adsan Law chief executive officer Susan Peh, who personally helps raise funds for charitable causes, said the award “serves as a constant reminder that even as we are speeding across the sea of changes, challenges and uncertainties, we need to remain anchored in our mission of providing not just value-added legal services but also dedicating our time and energy to our community at large, especially the underserved, during their time of greatest need”.

For Dentons Rodyk in second place, the high-powered annual dialogue it hosts in partnership with Singapore Management University (SMU), which brings together thought leaders on important topics, underpins its contribution to education.

Last month’s conversation, organised by the SMU Yong Pung How School of Law’s Centre for Commercial Law in Asia, centred on cyber security and featured as guest of honour Mrs Josephine Teo, Minister for Communications and Information, Second Minister for Home Affairs, and Minister-in-charge of Smart Nation and Cybersecurity.

Last year, as part of Dentons Rodyk’s events to mark its 160th birthday, Singapore’s oldest law firm raised more than $120,000 for the Singapore Association of Women Lawyers Scholarship Fund.

Besides charitable contributions, the firm also conducts pro bono initiatives aimed at the marginalised or disadvantaged, among others.

This year, it launched a philanthropy and non-profits practice group to help clients with charitable intentions to achieve their objectives.

Besides charitable contributions, the firm also conducts pro bono initiatives aimed at the marginalised or disadvantaged, among others. PHOTO: DENTONS RODYK

Rajah & Tann, which placed third, engages and supports the community through its foundation. It has partnered several charitable organisations on a range of causes this year, including A Packet of Rice, Fei Yue Family Service Centre, YMCA, Minds and Dementia Singapore. 

“Our collaboration and conversations with charities and non-profit organisations are regular, and our approach is consultative,” said a spokesman for the firm.

In addition, its lawyers actively take on pro bono cases and provide pro bono advice at various legal clinics, said the spokesman.

In May, the firm marked its 45th anniversary with a $450,000 donation to The Straits Times School Pocket Money Fund and Dementia Singapore.

Rajah & Tann marked its 45th anniversary with a 0,000 donation to The Straits Times School Pocket Money Fund and Dementia Singapore. PHOTO: ST FILE

Global firms like Jones Day and Herbert Smith Freehills have also partnered SMU in annual lecture events. Through its non-profit foundation, Jones Day contributed US$500,000 (S$691,000) to SMU to set up a Jones Day Professorship of Commercial Law for a term of seven years. The donation is the largest gift that SMU has received from a law firm.

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