Fitness industry explores new ways to adapt to latest guidelines

Staff covering up stationary bicycles at a True Fitness gym on May 7, the last day before the reintroduction of phase two measures. Under new guidelines, indoor facilities can offer only low-intensity activities.
Staff covering up stationary bicycles at a True Fitness gym on May 7, the last day before the reintroduction of phase two measures. Under new guidelines, indoor facilities can offer only low-intensity activities.ST PHOTO: JASON QUAH

For over 12 years, Strength Avenue owner Andyn Kadir has been encouraging his students to build resilience, be nimble and increase endurance. These days, he has to display those qualities as changes to Covid-19 measures have forced those in the fitness and sports industry to pivot quickly.

After Sport Singapore (SportSG) announced an initial round of tightened measures two weeks ago that allowed only low-intensity physical activities such as yoga and pilates to take place at gyms and fitness studios, the 36-year-old shifted the gym's classes outdoors.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on May 16, 2021, with the headline 'Fitness industry explores new ways to adapt to latest guidelines'. Subscribe