Sexual misconduct on campus: How can NUS make things right?

NUS students and staff queueing up to attend a town hall held by the university last Thursday to address concerns over the Peeping Tom incident. Ms Monica Baey, who was filmed in a hall shower, sparked a public outcry over how NUS deals with sexual m
Many NUS undergrads felt that the punishments – a one-semester suspension, a ban from entering Eusoff Hall (above) where the offence took place and mandatory counselling – were too lenient for the perpetrator. ST PHOTO: GIN TAY
Many NUS undergrads felt that the punishments - a one-semester suspension, a ban from entering Eusoff Hall (left) where the offence took place and mandatory counselling - were too lenient for the perpetrator.
NUS students and staff queueing up to attend a town hall held by the university last Thursday to address concerns over the Peeping Tom incident. ST PHOTO: KUA CHEE SIONG
NUS students and staff queueing up to attend a town hall held by the university last Thursday to address concerns over the Peeping Tom incident. Ms Monica Baey, who was filmed in a hall shower, sparked a public outcry over how NUS deals with sexual m
Ms Monica Baey, who was filmed in a hall shower, sparked a public outcry over how NUS deals with sexual misconduct. ST PHOTO: KUA CHEE SIONG

Observers call for tougher policy against offenders, more sensitivity for victims and greater transparency in actions

Does the National University of Singapore (NUS) know how to handle sexual offences? Going by the way it had treated a recent case involving two of its students, many members of the public and students do not think so.

A female undergraduate's frustrated Instagram posts after she was filmed in a hall shower has, in the last week, sparked a public outcry over how NUS deals with sexual misconduct, leading the university to apologise several times, and set up a committee to review its disciplinary framework.

Please or to continue reading the full article. Learn more about ST PREMIUM.

Enjoy unlimited access to ST's best work

  • Exclusive stories and features on multiple devices
  • In-depth analyses and opinion pieces
  • ePaper and award-winning multimedia content
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on April 28, 2019, with the headline 'How can NUS make things right?'. Print Edition | Subscribe