Burning Sun club, owned by BigBang singer Seungri, closing amid police probe?

Seungri had come under fire over reports of staff assaulting a club-goer, and subsequent police investigation of whether it was a hotspot for drug distribution and sexual harassment.
Seungri had come under fire over reports of staff assaulting a club-goer, and subsequent police investigation of whether it was a hotspot for drug distribution and sexual harassment.PHOTO: MUSIC MATTERS LIVE

SEOUL - Maybe the anger directed at Seungri will start to dissipate now that Seoul club Burning Sun reportedly stopped operating from Feb 17.

The BigBang singer, 28, who owns the club, had come under fire over reports of staff assaulting a club-goer, and subsequent police investigation of whether it was a hotspot for drug distribution and sexual harassment.

"We have decided to shut down business, in light of the ongoing investigation. This does not mean that we admit to all the controversies," the allkpop portal cited a club representative as saying.

An employee was said to have been arrested over drug use.

Seungri, on his part, has tried to repair the damage.

On Saturday (Feb 16) at his concert in Seoul, he apologised to his fans, saying: "I feel like if I ignore it, people who came today won't feel comfortable. I'm sorry for causing any disappointment to so many people, and I'm reflecting on what happened.

"Despite there being a controversy, I didn't act responsibly.

 
 

"As I'm a celebrity, I'll think and act more carefully from now on. I want to apologise for not showing modesty and for acting carelessly.

"For the past year, I've been doing my best to bring you all happiness. I've brought you disappointment and, for that, I'm ashamed."

 

The boss of his management agency YG Entertainment has also tried to calm the situation, revealing too that Seungri had resigned as an executive director of the club.

But the move is not directly linked to the hit on its reputation.

The singer, who will perform in Singapore on Saturday (Feb 23), is slated to enlist for mandatory military service soon, and the rules forbid a soldier from conducting business activities.