Water cut for over 300,000 households in Selangor over odour pollution

Air Selangor did not state when the plant would be operational again or when water supply would resume.
Air Selangor did not state when the plant would be operational again or when water supply would resume.PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: UNSPLASH

KUALA LUMPUR - Over 300,000 households in Malaysia's Selangor state were hit with water cuts on Saturday (Dec 21) after odour pollution was detected in the Semenyih river.

According to a statement from water supplier Air Selangor, the Sungai Semenyih Water Treatment Plant had to be fully shut down on Saturday morning, causing unscheduled water supply disruptions for 328,957 customer accounts in 348 areas in Petaling, Hulu Langat, Kuala Langat and Sepang, reported national news agency Bernama.

The utilities company said a river monitoring team from Air Selangor and Lembaga Urus Air Selangor had been mobilised to identify the source of the odour pollution along Sungai Semenyih and its tributaries.

It has activated its emergency procedures to assist affected customers.

Air Selangor did not state when the plant would be operational again or when water supply would resume, only saying the time frame would depend on the extent of the pollution.

The company was in the process of identifying the cause of the pollution and the parties responsible, it said in the statement.

The Sungai Semenyih plant has been shut down before for similar incidents of pollution.

In September it paused operations, causing unscheduled water cuts to over 350,000 households for two days. Air Selangor said its water source was contaminated by a sewage treatment facility in Bandar Bukit Mahkota, reported The Star.

"This is the fourth such incident this year that involves a main plant, leading to unscheduled water cuts," Air Selangor said at the time.

 

In July over a million households were affected by water cuts when the Sungai Selangor water treatment plants had to temporarily halt operations after odour pollution caused by an oil-based waste, reported the New Straits Times.