Over 60% of South Koreans trust North's willingness for denuclearisation: Poll

Pedestrians watch live footage of a joint press conference between South Korean President Moon Jae In and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during the inter-Korea summit, in downtown Seoul on April 27, 2018.
Pedestrians watch live footage of a joint press conference between South Korean President Moon Jae In and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during the inter-Korea summit, in downtown Seoul on April 27, 2018.PHOTO: AFP

SEOUL - More than 60 per cent of South Koreans have confidence in North Korea's stated willingness for denuclearisation and peace on the Korean peninsula, a survey showed on Monday (April 30).

In a Realmeter survey conducted on Friday when the historic inter-Korea summit took place, 64.7 per cent of respondents said they trust Pyongyang's will to denuclearise and work towards a lasting peace on the peninsula, Yonhap news agency reported.

Those who do not trust the North comprised 28.3 per cent, while 7 per cent said they were unsure.

In the Panmunjom Declaration following the summit between South Korean President Moon Jae In and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, they affirmed "complete denuclearisation" and agreed to halt all hostile acts against each other, as well as seek a formal end to the 1950-53 Korean War and a peace regime, among other things.

In the same survey, 52.1 per cent of respondents said they used to distrust the North, but they now trust it, while 26.2 per cent said they did not trust and still do not trust the North.

Those who said they trusted the North in the past and do trust it now made up 12.6 per cent.

Commissioned by local broadcaster CBS, the survey was conducted on 500 adults across the country. It had a margin of error of 4.4 percentage points, with a 95 per cent confidence level.