Global frustration with injustice boils over after Floyd's death

Younger generation seen driving movements against racism and colonialism's legacies

Protesters outside the Minneapolis Police and Fire Union offices on Friday. As "Black Lives Matter" graffiti and banners appear around the world, and monuments glorifying colonial and Confederate figures are destroyed, institutions in Britain and Ame
Protesters outside the Minneapolis Police and Fire Union offices on Friday. As "Black Lives Matter" graffiti and banners appear around the world, and monuments glorifying colonial and Confederate figures are destroyed, institutions in Britain and America are debating whether to sever their links with colonial or slavery-era names. PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE
Gift this subscriber-only story to your friends and family

Before his death on May 25, as he lay handcuffed face down on a Minneapolis street with a Caucasian police officer's knee on his neck, Mr George Floyd was just another African American man.

Yet his fate now resonates around the world.

Already a subscriber? 

Read the full story and more at $9.90/month

Get exclusive reports and insights with more than 500 subscriber-only articles every month

Unlock these benefits

  • All subscriber-only content on ST app and straitstimes.com

  • Easy access any time via ST app on 1 mobile device

  • E-paper with 2-week archive so you won't miss out on content that matters to you

Join ST's Telegram channel and get the latest breaking news delivered to you.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on June 14, 2020, with the headline Global frustration with injustice boils over after Floyd's death. Subscribe