Fiery, destructive and wet: A look at the other crisis - climate change

This year's fire season was the worst in a decade in terms of the number of blazes.
This year's fire season was the worst in a decade in terms of the number of blazes.PHOTO: AFP
A home is seen fully engulfed in flames during the Glass Fire in St. Helena, California, US on Sept 27, 2020.
A home is seen fully engulfed in flames during the Glass Fire in St. Helena, California, US on Sept 27, 2020.PHOTO: REUTERS
A fallen tree lies in an area of the Amazon jungle that was cleared by loggers and farmers near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil, on Aug 14, 2020.
A fallen tree lies in an area of the Amazon jungle that was cleared by loggers and farmers near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil, on Aug 14, 2020.PHOTO: REUTERS
The melted sign of the Oak Park Motel destroyed by the flames of the Beachie Creek Fire is seen in Gates, east of Salem, Oregon, on Sept 13, 2020.
The melted sign of the Oak Park Motel destroyed by the flames of the Beachie Creek Fire is seen in Gates, east of Salem, Oregon, on Sept 13, 2020.PHOTO: AFP
Residents wade through a flooded street following Typhoon Vamco, in Rizal Province, Philippines, on Nov 12, 2020.
Residents wade through a flooded street following Typhoon Vamco, in Rizal Province, Philippines, on Nov 12, 2020.PHOTO: REUTERS
Men walk along a flooded road after the River Chirichil overflowed following heavy rains caused during the passage of Hurricane Eta in Toyos, Honduras, on Nov 4, 2020.
Men walk along a flooded road after the River Chirichil overflowed following heavy rains caused during the passage of Hurricane Eta in Toyos, Honduras, on Nov 4, 2020.PHOTO: AFP

SINGAPORE - As Covid-19 ravaged livelihoods and economies this year, another crisis piled on more misery, reminding the world that even when the pandemic eventually subsides, a larger crisis remains for mankind to tackle: climate change.

The world is steadily getting hotter and this has tipped into dangerous territory. Warmer oceans and a hotter atmosphere are changing weather patterns and fuelling more extreme heatwaves, storms, floods as well as longer droughts and deadlier wildfires.

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