UK court rules to end 12-year-old boy's life support

UK courts earlier found that ending life-preserving treatment for the boy was in his best interests as doctors believe he is brain-stem dead. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: PEXELS

LONDON (AFP) - A UK court on Monday (Aug 1) ruled to end life support for a 12-year-old boy despite opposition from his parents and a last-minute intervention by the United Nations.

The Court of Appeal in London decided doctors can switch off life support for Archie Battersbee from 12pm (1100 GMT) on Tuesday.

Archie had been due to have his life support at the Royal London Hospital ended on Monday afternoon after his parents failed in a domestic legal bid to halt the move.

Archie's mother, Ms Hollie Dance, discovered him unconscious at home in April with signs he had placed a ligature over his head, possibly after taking part in an online asphyxiation challenge.

UK courts earlier found that ending life-preserving treatment for Archie was in his best interests as doctors believe he is brain-stem dead.

As a last resort, Archie's parents applied to the United Nations and the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

The UN committee requested on Friday that his treatment be continued while Archie's case was under consideration.

The UK government then asked the Court of Appeal to "urgently consider" his case on Monday afternoon.

An appeal court judge argued the UN request was not enforceable, but granted a delay until 12 noon on Tuesday.

The Court of Appeal is a High Court based at the Royal Courts of Justice in London.

Archie's mother in an interview with Sky News condemned what she called the "choreographed execution of my son".

"It's so traumatic: to just be dragged through courts, no empathy, no compassion," she said.

Archie's parents are being supported by a campaign organisation, the Christian Legal Centre.

The centre's chief executive, Ms Andrea Williams, tweeted that the case "goes right to the heart of protections at end of life".

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