At 92, Britain's Queen Elizabeth posts first Instagram photo

Britain's Queen Elizabeth wrote about her visit to the Science Museum in London on March 7, 2019, in her first Instagram post.
Britain's Queen Elizabeth wrote about her visit to the Science Museum in London on March 7, 2019, in her first Instagram post.PHOTO: AFP
The first Instagram post by Britain's Queen Elizabeth is displayed alongside a letter to Prince Albert, during the Queen's visit to the Science Museum in London on March 7, 2019.
The first Instagram post by Britain's Queen Elizabeth is displayed alongside a letter to Prince Albert, during the Queen's visit to the Science Museum in London on March 7, 2019.PHOTO: AFP

LONDON (REUTERS) - Britain's Queen Elizabeth entered the world of hi-tech communications on Thursday (March 7) with a visit to the new "Top Secret" exhibition at London's Science Museum.

The 92-year-old monarch saw a World War Two enigma code machine and the original NeXT computer used by Tim Berners-Lee to design the World Wide Web in 1989.

She also marked the opening of the museum's Smith Centre by sharing an archive image on the royal family's Instagram account.

It was her first time posting on the photo-sharing platform where the royal family has 4.5 million followers.

"Today, I had the pleasure of learning about children's computer coding initiatives and it seems fitting to me that I publish this Instagram post, at the Science Museum which has long championed technology, innovation and inspired the next generation of inventors," she wrote.

The post garnered 39,641 likes two hours after being posted.

Queen Elizabeth first toured the Science Museum in 1938 and, during her last visit in 2014, opened the Information Age gallery by sending her first Tweet.

Today, as I visit the Science Museum I was interested to discover a letter from the Royal Archives, written in 1843 to my great-great-grandfather Prince Albert.  Charles Babbage, credited as the world’s first computer pioneer, designed the “Difference Engine”, of which Prince Albert had the opportunity to see a prototype in July 1843.  In the letter, Babbage told Queen Victoria and Prince Albert about his invention the “Analytical Engine” upon which the first computer programmes were created by Ada Lovelace, a daughter of Lord Byron.  Today, I had the pleasure of learning about children’s computer coding initiatives and it seems fitting to me that I publish this Instagram post, at the Science Museum which has long championed technology, innovation and inspired the next generation of inventors. Elizabeth R. PHOTOS: Supplied by the Royal Archives © Royal Collection Trust / Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2019