Delivery woes

Delivery riders in India speak out against 'unfair' conditions, wages

Delivery workers from Indian food delivery service Zomato waiting to collect orders outside a restaurant in Kolkata last month. Some of the company's riders have complained of long working hours that come with risks such as accidents, police harassme
Delivery workers from Indian food delivery service Zomato waiting to collect orders outside a restaurant in Kolkata last month. Some of the company's riders have complained of long working hours that come with risks such as accidents, police harassment and health problems. PHOTO: REUTERS
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Arshad Khan (not his real name) lost his job as a supervisor at a construction site earlier this year. A desperate search yielded nothing for months, forcing him to become a rider with Zomato, an Indian food delivery service, in June.

Being employed has turned out to be a small mercy for Mr Khan. He works nearly 12 hours a day, seven days a week, covering around 100km daily on his motorcycle in Noida, a suburb of New Delhi.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 16, 2021, with the headline Delivery riders in India speak out against 'unfair' conditions, wages. Subscribe