Tech review: Dyson Pure Cool Me makes getting personal clean air a breeze

Instead of the usual circle or oval frames you see on Dyson's bladeless fans, the Pure Cool Me has a sleek "three-quarter" sphere structure on top of a cylindrical base with a hole-laden aluminium shell.
Instead of the usual circle or oval frames you see on Dyson's bladeless fans, the Pure Cool Me has a sleek "three-quarter" sphere structure on top of a cylindrical base with a hole-laden aluminium shell.PHOTO: DYSON

Known for its bladeless fans that have become a design icon, home appliance giant Dyson recently introduced its first personal air purifier fan, called the Pure Cool Me.

Available in gunmetal/copper and white/silver (version tested) colour combinations, it uses a new Dyson technology called Core Flow, instead of the Air Multiplier technology found in Dyson's bladeless fans.

Core Flow works by making two jets of air meet on a convex surface to create a high-pressure core and, as a result, a focused directional stream of air.

Instead of the usual circle or oval frames you see on Dyson's bladeless fans, the Pure Cool Me has a sleek "three-quarter" sphere structure on top of a cylindrical base with a hole-laden aluminium shell.

It comes with an equally sleek-looking remote control that can be magnetically attached to the front of the base.

Within the sphere structure is a dome that you push up and down to change the airflow's angle between 45 degrees and almost horizontal. This dome is the convex surface needed by Core Flow, in which two jets of air - drawn from its base - meet to produce a directional stream of purified air.

I found the air stream to be focused. With the Pure Cool Me sitting on my study table about 80cm from me and with the air flow directed towards my face, I could place a stack of paper on the table without it being blown away.

  • FOR

    • Sleek look

    • Produces a nice focused stream of air

    • Doubles as an air purifier

    AGAINST

    • A tad loud at the maximum fan speed

    • No app support

    • Expensive

    TECH SPECS

    PRICE: $499

    WEIGHT: 2.7kg

    RATING

    FEATURES: 3/5

    DESIGN: 5/5

    PERFORMANCE: 4/5

    VALUE FOR MONEY: 3/5

    OVERALL: 4/5

Inside the base is the activated carbon and glass Hepa filter that is said to capture 99.95 per cent of allergens and ultra-fine particles such as pollen and mould spores.

Unlike the Pure Cool air purifier fans, the Pure Cool Me does not have an app that shows how effectively the air purifier is working. But you can get an indication by looking at the filter dirt level via a small round display at the front bottom of the base.

The remote control allows you toggle through information, such as filter dirt level, fan speed and timer, on the display. Its intelligent light sensors automatically dim or brighten the display by tracking the brightness of ambient light. This is useful so you will not get affected by the display's lighting when you are asleep.

There is also a sleep-timer feature that lets you switch it off, with the pre-set timings ranging from 30 minutes to eight hours.

It allows for 70-degree oscillation to cool and purify a small study room or bedroom. But I feel it works best when the fan is directed only at me.

It is a tad loud at the maximum fan speed of 10. But this is still not as loud as a conventional fan. I find it whisper quiet at the sixth speed setting.

The Pure Cool Me is not cheap. At $499, you can get at least three conventional table fans.

But you certainly will not get the fixed focus stream of air it provides.