Millennials in Singapore spend almost 3.4 hours a day on their mobile phones: Study

MRT commuters using their mobile phones while waiting for the train at City Hall station.
MRT commuters using their mobile phones while waiting for the train at City Hall station. ST PHOTO: NEO XIAOBIN

SINGAPORE - Singapore's millennials - those aged between 16 and 30 - spend an average of one day a week, or 3.4 hours per day, on their mobile phones, according to a study conducted by global research consultancy TNS.

This figure is 0.6 hours more than the overall average of 2.8 hours spent by millennials in the Asia Pacific region.

Singapore, however, did not emerge top in the mobile phone usage. The Thais are the most "addicted" to their phones, the survey said. Its millennials spend an average of 4.2 hours per day glued to their devices.

China (3.9) and Malaysia (3.8) were also ranked ahead of Singapore, while the Japanese ranked the lowest, spending just 1.6 hours per day.

The study, called Connected Life, surveyed 60,500 Internet users across 50 countries.

Connected Life also found that 46 per cent of Asia-Pacific millennials used their mobile devices to surf social media platforms. Forty-two per cent watched videos, with the remaining 12 per cent using their phones to do online shopping.

Said Mr Jon Foged, managing director of TNS Singapore: "Singaporeans are some of the most connected consumers in the world. Wherever you are - sitting on the MRT, shopping in a mall, eating in a restaurant - you're bound to see young people on their smartphones."

Compared to the younger generation, older consumers (the 46-65 age group) in Singapore who go online still favour traditional media. They spend 1.6 hours a day watching television, and almost 25 minutes listening to the radio and reading newspapers.

They also spend 2.3 hours a day on their phones, with more than half using Facebook on a daily basis.

Mr Foged warned against "making sweeping assumptions about the digital habits of different age groups".

"Singaporean millennials are highly active on social media, especially when it comes to on-demand video, but then older generations generally have higher disposable incomes," he explained.