Sport: Almost 10,000 have undergone onboarding at Active Health Labs, says MCCY

Mr Joseph Chen, 27, is assisted by Ms Jasmine Tan, 30, an Active Health Expert from the Active Health Lab, during a treadmill exercise designed to bring his heart rate up to a specified intensity, on March 6, 2018.
Mr Joseph Chen, 27, is assisted by Ms Jasmine Tan, 30, an Active Health Expert from the Active Health Lab, during a treadmill exercise designed to bring his heart rate up to a specified intensity, on March 6, 2018.PHOTO: ST FILE

SINGAPORE - Some 9,567 people have undergone the onboarding process at Active Health Labs over the last year, the Ministry of Culture, Community and Youth (MCCY) revealed in a review of the work done in its various sectors in 2018.

This is up from about 2,200 in March 2018, after the first of two Active Health Labs was opened at Our Tampines Hub in August 2017. A second lab, at Heartbeat @ Bedok, was opened last February.

The labs are part of the Active Health movement run by national sport agency Sport Singapore (SportSG) with the aim of promoting ownership of one's health.

Onboarding is a process whereby a person's current health and fitness levels are assessed, following which experts would be able to personalise wellness plans such as exercises or lifestyle habits for that individual.

In total, the movement has reached over 80,000 people through roadshows and community events, added the MCCY.

Minister for Culture, Community and Youth Grace Fu said that while the encouraging numbers are a "good start for the first year", the movement also plays an important social role for participants.

"It's not just about getting the individual interested in taking ownership of his own health and exercise regimen, but we're also in the process building some social network around the person," she said.

 
 
 

"So if you're going through the onboarding with 20 other people, we're hoping that the social bonds, the peer relationships will help the individual carry on with his health and exercise regimen better.

"It's also about building social ties between people who may not know each other, even though they may be from the same neighbourhood."

She added: "Numbers are good, but when we review a success of a programme, we put qualitative KPIs (key performance indicators) around it.

"Do the people keep to a regimen after they undergo an on-boarding session? Do they take up regular exercise? Sleep and eat better? Is it better done through a doctor nudging or a friend?"

Participants who undergo onboarding at an Active Health Lab can choose to attend a customised 12-week programme, clinics, or subscribe to an array of programme offerings by ActiveSG that meets their needs.

In response to queries, a SportSG spokesman said 535 participants have completed the entire 12-week course, with results showing that on average, participants saw improvements in their BMI and systolic blood pressure, as well as reduced waist circumference.

The spokesman added: "Participants who have sustained their participation in Active Health programmes shared that there have been improvements in their fitness and health.

"Many participants enjoyed the free and easy access to sport and exercise experts who are able to provide them personalised tips and advice based on health measurements obtained through onboarding.

"Our Active Health programmes have also helped people build friendships with fellow participants, and this has in turn motivated them to continue participating in activities together."

SportSG plans to set up four more Active Health Labs at sport centres in Jurong East, Sengkang, Bishan and Woodlands, before the end of the year.