Gymnastics: Sex abuse victim Aly Raisman slams disgraced doctor Larry Nassar, calls him a 'monster'

Former USA Gymnastics team doctor Lawrence Nassar, accused of molesting dozens of female athletes over several decades, appears at Ingham County Circuit Court in Lansing, Michigan, on Nov 22, 2017.
Former USA Gymnastics team doctor Lawrence Nassar, accused of molesting dozens of female athletes over several decades, appears at Ingham County Circuit Court in Lansing, Michigan, on Nov 22, 2017.PHOTO: AFP

LANSING, UNITED STATES (AFP) - Former USA Gymnastics team doctor Lawrence "Larry" Nassar, accused of molesting more than 100 female athletes over several decades, pleaded guilty on Wednesday (Nov 23) to multiple counts of criminal sexual conduct.

Nassar - who was involved with USA Gymnastics for nearly three decades and worked with the country's gymnasts at four separate Olympic Games - could be sentenced to at least 25 years in prison.

He faced 22 criminal counts of sexual assault in Michigan for abusing athletes under the guise of providing medical treatment. As part of a plea agreement, Nassar admitted to seven counts of abuse.

Three of his victims were under 13 years old, and the others were aged between 13 and 15.

Judge Rosemarie Aquilina, addressing both Nassar and victims in the packed courtroom, said the former doctor's words "fall very short".

"You used that position of trust that you had in the most vile way - to abuse children," Aquilina said. "I agree that now is a time of healing. But, it may take them a lifetime of healing, while you spend your lifetime behind bars."

Olympic gold medal-winning gymnasts Aly Raisman, McKayla Maroney and Gabby Douglas are among those who made allegations that Nassar abused them.

Raisman reacted to the court hearing on Twitter, calling Nassar "a MONSTER, not a doctor".

Former gymnast Rachael Denhollander, the first to publicly accuse Nassar, doubted his courtroom apology.

"He's a consummate narcissist. He's a master manipulator," Denhollander said at a post-hearing news conference.

"I don't believe there was anything sincere in what Larry said, other than his desire to refocus the attention on the good that he believed he did today."