World's rarest macaws on 10-year loan at Jurong Bird Park

The endangered Lear’s Macaw is distinguishable by its yellow teardrop-shaped marking near its beak.
The endangered Lear’s Macaw is distinguishable by its yellow teardrop-shaped marking near its beak. PHOTO: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE
The critically endangered Spix’s Macaw is likely extinct in the wild with just over 150 individuals left under human care worldwide.
The critically endangered Spix’s Macaw is likely extinct in the wild with just over 150 individuals left under human care worldwide.PHOTO: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

SINGAPORE - Six of the world's rarest macaws - two critically endangered Spix's Macaws and four endangered Lear's Macaws - have arrived in Singapore on a 10-year loan at the Jurong Bird Park.

The Spix's Macaws are from Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation in Qatar, while the Lear's Macaws came from the Germany-based Association for the Conservation of Threatened Parrots, Wildlife Reserves Singapore said in a statement on Friday (Nov 3).

Their arrival means Jurong Bird Park is now the only zoological park in the world where visitors can view all three existing species of the blue macaw family.

The park is already home to the third existing species - the Hyacinth Macaw.

The last member of the blue macaw family, the Glaucous Macaw, has not been seen since the 1960s and is believed to be extinct.

The critically endangered Spix's Macaw is believed to be extinct in the wild, with the last confirmed sighting in 2005.

There are only more than 150 of the birds left in the care of humans worldwide.

The bird, also known as the Little Blue Macaw, inspired the Rio movie series.

There are about 1,300 Lear's Macaws left in the wild.

The macaws are in Singapore on a 10-year loan agreement, and they make their debut in Jurong Bird Park as part of the golden jubilee of diplomatic relations between Brazil and Singapore.

Last year, Jurong Bird Park committed to provide support in establishing a breeding and release facility in Brazil, with the aim of reintroducing the Spix's Macaw into the wild.

Brazil is the native homeland of the species.

Visitors can view the blue macaws at Jurong Bird Park's Parrot Paradise exhibit from Nov 22.