When winter escape to Singapore becomes flight of death for migratory birds

Call to prevent migratory birds from smashing into buildings

Birds found dead after crashing into buildings in Singapore (clockwise from left): an adult male jambu fruit dove, a near-threatened species that is native to South-east Asia; a sparrowhawk, which migrates during the northern winter months from its b
Birds found dead after crashing into buildings in Singapore: An adult male jambu fruit dove, a near-threatened species that is native to South-east Asia. PHOTOS: COURTESY OF DAVID TAN
Birds found dead after crashing into buildings in Singapore (clockwise from left): an adult male jambu fruit dove, a near-threatened species that is native to South-east Asia; a sparrowhawk, which migrates during the northern winter months from its b
Birds found dead after crashing into buildings in Singapore: A sparrowhawk, which migrates during the northern winter months from its breeding grounds in south-eastern China, Taiwan and the Korean peninsula, to Indonesia and the Philippines. PHOTOS: COURTESY OF DAVID TAN
Birds found dead after crashing into buildings in Singapore (clockwise from left): an adult male jambu fruit dove, a near-threatened species that is native to South-east Asia; a sparrowhawk, which migrates during the northern winter months from its b
Birds found dead after crashing into buildings in Singapore: A blue-winged pitta. PHOTOS: COURTESY OF DAVID TAN
Birds found dead after crashing into buildings in Singapore (clockwise from left): an adult male jambu fruit dove, a near-threatened species that is native to South-east Asia; a sparrowhawk, which migrates during the northern winter months from its b
Birds found dead after crashing into buildings in Singapore: A female yellow-rumped flycatcher, which breeds in East Asia. PHOTOS: COURTESY OF DAVID TAN
Birds found dead after crashing into buildings in Singapore (clockwise from left): an adult male jambu fruit dove, a near-threatened species that is native to South-east Asia; a sparrowhawk, which migrates during the northern winter months from its b
Birds found dead after crashing into buildings in Singapore: A chestnut-winged cuckoo, a species more often seen in wooded areas in the Central Catchment Nature Reserve or on Coney Island. PHOTOS: COURTESY OF DAVID TAN
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It is a grisly sign of the peak bird migration season, said National University of Singapore researcher David Tan.

He was referring to more bird carcasses being found on pavements these past few weeks.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on October 18, 2018, with the headline When winter escape to Singapore becomes flight of death for migratory birds. Subscribe