Using blockchain to boost transparency, safety in food sector

Mr Gary Loh, the founder of Singapore-based blockchain start-up DiMuto. Set up last year, it has helped to tag 30 million fruits globally, worth US$100 million (S$135 million). Each fruit has a QR code that links to information such as the fruit's or
Mr Gary Loh, the founder of Singapore-based blockchain start-up DiMuto. Set up last year, it has helped to tag 30 million fruits globally, worth US$100 million (S$135 million). Each fruit has a QR code that links to information such as the fruit's origin, packing location and product certificate.PHOTO: DIMUTO
Mr Gary Loh, the founder of Singapore-based blockchain start-up DiMuto. Set up last year, it has helped to tag 30 million fruits globally, worth US$100 million (S$135 million). Each fruit has a QR code that links to information such as the fruit's or
Mr Gary Loh, the founder of Singapore-based blockchain start-up DiMuto. Set up last year, it has helped to tag 30 million fruits globally, worth US$100 million (S$135 million). Each fruit has a QR code that links to information such as the fruit's origin, packing location and product certificate.PHOTO: LIANHE ZAOBAO FILE

How authentic are food labels such as halal, organic and fair trade?

Until recently, trust was all consumers had to go on.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on December 29, 2019, with the headline 'Using blockchain to boost transparency, safety in food sector'. Print Edition | Subscribe