Trying to break the cycle of family violence

Complaints about family violence rose last year, when the Covid-19 pandemic forced families into close quarters for prolonged periods - putting the issue in the spotlight. Goh Yan Han looks at what is being done to tackle violence at home.

A study suggests that many individuals who suffered abuse became, in turn, abusers themselves. PHOTO: ST FILE
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SINGAPORE - A recent internal government study found that of 831 individuals who had filed for a personal protection order (PPO), about 11 per cent had the same order made against them later in life.

This suggested that a number of individuals who suffered abuse became, in turn, abusers themselves.

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