Trump-Kim summit: Sentosa's Capella provides scenic backdrop for meeting but also security headaches

Experts said the choice of the Capella Singapore hotel on Sentosa island to hold the Trump-Kim summit meant that security agencies will have to plan for potential maritime incursions.
Experts said the choice of the Capella Singapore hotel on Sentosa island to hold the Trump-Kim summit meant that security agencies will have to plan for potential maritime incursions.ST PHOTO: DESMOND FOO
The hotel, designed by renowned British architect Norman Foster, has 111 guestrooms and a presidential manor, spread over 12ha of land.
The hotel, designed by renowned British architect Norman Foster, has 111 guestrooms and a presidential manor, spread over 12ha of land.ST PHOTO: JONATHAN CHOO
A photo of Capella Hotel in Sentosa seen in a photo released on June 5, 2018.
A photo of Capella Hotel in Sentosa seen in a photo released on June 5, 2018. PHOTO: REUTERS
Capella Hotel, which sits in the middle of 12ha of lawns and rainforest, had been identified as a possible location in the run-up to the summit.
Capella Hotel, which sits in the middle of 12ha of lawns and rainforest, had been identified as a possible location in the run-up to the summit. ST PHOTO: ONG WEE JIN
Capella Hotel's location is secluded and private, which experts say could be a key consideration for security-conscious US and North Korea.
Capella Hotel's location is secluded and private, which experts say could be a key consideration for security-conscious US and North Korea.PHOTO: LIANHE ZAOBAO
A view of Capella Hotel on Sentosa Island in a picture taken on June 4, 2018.
A view of Capella Hotel on Sentosa Island in a picture taken on June 4, 2018.PHOTO: REUTERS

SINGAPORE - While the choice of Capella Singapore hotel in Sentosa as the meeting place for US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un will provide a scenic setting for the summit, experts say protecting it will require more security resources than if the event was held in the city.

For one thing, security agencies will have to plan for potential maritime incursions, said Mr Muhammad Faizal Abdul Rahman from the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies' (RSIS') Centre of Excellence for National Security.

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