Sats' new tech cuts waste from airplane meals

Ground-handling firm Sats, which provides in-flight meals, has extended its kitchen in Changi North. The facility can now produce up to 60,000 meals a day. With new technology, some food can be stored for up to 24 months, cutting down waste.
Members of Sats' kitchen crew dishing nasi goreng (above) into the thermoforming line to extend the shelf life of the food, and using an auto-fryer to cook a large batch of noodles (left) in the extended kitchen facility at Changi North.
Members of Sats' kitchen crew dishing nasi goreng (above) into the thermoforming line to extend the shelf life of the food, and using an auto-fryer to cook a large batch of noodles in the extended kitchen facility at Changi North. With the new equipment, it takes half an hour to cook 60kg of noodles, compared with 90 minutes previously. ST PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI
Members of Sats' kitchen crew dishing nasi goreng (above) into the thermoforming line to extend the shelf life of the food, and using an auto-fryer to cook a large batch of noodles (left) in the extended kitchen facility at Changi North.
Members of Sats' kitchen crew dishing nasi goreng into the thermoforming line to extend the shelf life of the food, and using an auto-fryer to cook a large batch of noodles (above) in the extended kitchen facility at Changi North. With the new equipment, it takes half an hour to cook 60kg of noodles, compared with 90 minutes previously. ST PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI

After every flight, extra meals end up in the bin.

To reduce waste, Sats, a major player in the food industry and Changi Airport's main airline caterer, has invested in new technology to extend the shelf life of cooked food. This means that those extra meals can be served at a later date instead of getting junked.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 12, 2019, with the headline 'Sats' new tech cuts waste from airplane meals'. Print Edition | Subscribe