Bombardier awarded $1.2 billion contract to replace 66 oldest MRT trains

An artist’s impression of one of the new trains by Bombardier, which will replace 66 first-generation trains that have been in service from the time the MRT started more than 30 years ago.
An artist’s impression of one of the new trains by Bombardier, which will replace 66 first-generation trains that have been in service from the time the MRT started more than 30 years ago.PHOTO: LTA
The new trains' tip-up seats can be folded up during peak hours to create more room for passengers, such as parents with strollers, wheelchair users and commuters with personal mobility devices or foldable bicycles.
The new trains' tip-up seats can be folded up during peak hours to create more room for passengers, such as parents with strollers, wheelchair users and commuters with personal mobility devices or foldable bicycles.PHOTO: LTA
The Bombardier trains will come with new features designed to boost reliability. These include condition-monitoring sensors and back-end analytic systems which will allow engineers to detect and address anomalies early.
The Bombardier trains will come with new features designed to boost reliability. These include condition-monitoring sensors and back-end analytic systems which will allow engineers to detect and address anomalies early.PHOTO: LTA

SINGAPORE - Canadian engineering giant Bombardier has been awarded a $1.2 billion contract to supply 66 new trains for the North-South, East-West MRT lines.

The amount includes a service support contract.

The new trains, slated to arrive from 2021, will replace 66 first-generation trains which have been in service from the time the MRT started more than 30 years ago.

Speaking at the tender award ceremony at Tuas Depot on Wednesday (July 25), Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan said the Bombardier trains will come with new features designed to boost reliability. These include condition-monitoring sensors and back-end analytic systems which will allow engineers to detect and address anomalies early.

Mr Khaw said this will significantly reduce the chances of train faults arising.

Four of the 66 new trains will also be fitted with an automatic track inspection system, which uses cameras, lasers and sensors to help detect rail defects.

Said Mr Khaw: "The MRT system has many core components, but to the commuters, trains are the most tangible aspect of their daily experience."

He said the new trains will be able to cater to parents with strollers, wheelchair users and commuters with personal mobility devices or foldable bicycles, while maintaining the same number of seats.

This is possible with the trains' tip-up seats that can be folded up during peak hours to create more room for passengers.

 

Mr Khaw added: "We are halfway through the asset renewal programme for the North-South and East-West lines. Later this year, we will commence the task of renewing the power supply. Work on replacing the track circuits will also begin later this year."