92kg e-scooter heaviest seized so far amid stricter enforcement against errant PMD users

Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan shared photos of the illegal e-scooter and other impounded devices on his Facebook page.
Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan shared photos of the illegal e-scooter and other impounded devices on his Facebook page.PHOTO: FACEBOOK/KHAW BOON WAN
At 92kg, the e-scooter is the heaviest seized to date and is way above the maximum allowable weight of 20kg. PHOTO: FACEBOOK/KHAW BOON WAN
At 92kg, the e-scooter is the heaviest seized to date and is way above the maximum allowable weight of 20kg. PHOTO: FACEBOOK/KHAW BOON WANPHOTO: FACEBOOK/KHAW BOON WAN
Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan noted that "changing habits take time", and hence, the authorities are tightening enforcement against errant PMD users in the mean time.
Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan noted that "changing habits take time", and hence, the authorities are tightening enforcement against errant PMD users in the mean time. PHOTO: FACEBOOK/KHAW BOON WAN
Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan said that most users are responsible in ensuring safety for themselves and others.
Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan said that most users are responsible in ensuring safety for themselves and others.PHOTO: FACEBOOK/KHAW BOON WAN

SINGAPORE - An electric scooter nearly five times above the legal weight was seized by the authorities following tightened enforcement against errant personal mobility device (PMD) users, said Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan.

At 92kg, the e-scooter is the heaviest seized to date and is way above the maximum allowable weight of 20kg, he added.

Previously, the Land Transport Authority (LTA) revealed that it had seized a 64kg e-scooter in enforcement operations in May.

On Saturday (June 3), Mr Khaw shared photos on Facebook of the illegal e-scooter and other devices that have been impounded, which were taken during his visit to the LTA's vehicle pound.

During investigations, the PMDs are kept securely in the storage facility through strict process and are placed under round-the-clock closed circuit television monitoring, he said.

As PMDs and bicycles are increasingly used in first- and last-mile connectivity, more needs to be done to educate users and promote responsible riding, he added.

Mr Khaw said that most users are responsible in ensuring safety for themselves and others.

"But we do get some who are not thoughtful, riding dangerously, or using non-compliant PMDs," he wrote. "Power-assisted ones, like e-scooters and e-bikes, pose the greater risk, given their weight and speed."

Of the devices he saw at LTA's facility, some were seized for speeding, while others were illegally modified, he added.

 
 

Mr Khaw noted that "changing habits take time", and hence, the authorities are tightening enforcement against errant PMD users in the mean time.

Under the Active Mobility Act, which came into effect on May 1, PMDs have to adhere to weight, width and speed limits, with the rules also spelling out where the devices can be used.

These devices should weigh a maximum of 20kg, have a maximum width of 70cm and a maximum motorised speed of 25kmh.

In his post, Mr Khaw said that the Act is an important step closer towards a safer riding culture.

Offenders may face a jail term of up to six months, a $10,000 fine or both.