Coronavirus Digitalisation: People with disabilities

Tech helps improve lives but also leaves some struggling

Mr Dennis Teo, who is almost completely blind, says technology helps him in various ways. A reflection of his face is seen above on the screen of a smart device that lets him control his home appliances using his voice.
Mr Dennis Teo, who is almost completely blind, says technology helps him in various ways. A reflection of his face is seen above on the screen of a smart device that lets him control his home appliances using his voice. ST PHOTO: KEVIN LIM
New: Gift this subscriber-only story to your friends and family

Senior finance executive Phillip Ang's heart sinks each time he has to use his mobile phone to scan QR codes for contact tracing before entering public places.

A spinal muscular atrophy condition prevents Mr Ang, 55, from moving his hands much, and the QR codes are "always too high", so he has to ask for help.

Already a subscriber? 

Dive deeper at $0.99/month

Want more exclusives, sharp insights into what's happening at home and abroad? Subscribe to stay informed.

Unlock these benefits

  • All subscriber-only content on ST app and straitstimes.com

  • Easy access any time via ST app on 1 mobile device

  • 2-week e-paper archive so you never miss out on any topic that matters to you

Join ST's Telegram channel and get the latest breaking news delivered to you.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on November 07, 2020, with the headline Tech helps improve lives but also leaves some struggling. Subscribe