Still many hurdles in world of blind people

Mr Ong Hon Choon and his wife, Gina, both 38, are legally blind and are struggling to live independently. They have three normal-sighted children - Niro, seven, Nikki, three, and Niomi, 10 months. Mrs Ong is unable to work because of her condition, a
Mr Ong Hon Choon and his wife, Gina, both 38, are legally blind and are struggling to live independently. They have three normal-sighted children - Niro, seven, Nikki, three, and Niomi, 10 months.ST PHOTO: ALPHONSUS CHERN

Problems include getting jobs and childcare subsidies, and lack of empathy among public

Life for the visually handicapped is a lot better today, with aids like tactile floors and steps, bigger lettering on signs and handrails with braille to help them get around.

But more can be done to make Singapore as inclusive a society as possible for blind people and other persons with disabilities, said Mr Yeo Ando, executive director of the Singapore Association of the Visually Handicapped (SAVH), which has more than 4,000 members.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on May 27, 2019, with the headline 'Still many hurdles in world of blind people'. Print Edition | Subscribe