Being filmed by molka: Spycam epidemic in South Korea

Mr Son Hae-young, an expert at detecting spycam and tapping, is seen here conducting a class for police officers on how to discover hidden cameras. His team of 11 handles 200 cases a month. His clients are mostly women in their 20s and 30s who live a
Mr Son Hae-young, an expert at detecting spycam and tapping, is seen here conducting a class for police officers on how to discover hidden cameras. His team of 11 handles 200 cases a month. His clients are mostly women in their 20s and 30s who live alone and suspect that someone has installed a spycam.PHOTO: SON HAE-YOUNG

Number of reported crime cases tied to spycam surged from 1,100 in 2010 to 6,800 last year

Whenever she goes to a public toilet, office worker Kim Young-eun first scrutinises the cubicle to check that there is no spycam inside filming her every move so she doesn't end up in a porn clip. "It feels terrible that we cannot protect ourselves, and I'm afraid of being filmed without my knowledge," Ms Kim, 24, told The Sunday Times.

Being filmed by hidden cameras in South Korea is a widespread problem - an "epidemic", say some reports - that shows no sign of abating, perpetuated by voyeurs, vengeful ex-boyfriends, even K-pop stars.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on March 24, 2019, with the headline 'Spycam epidemic in South Korea '. Print Edition | Subscribe