SMU students return home after bus accident in Vietnam

The students were part of a group of 30 who were in the central Vietnamese city of Hue for the fourth edition of Project Phoniksa, launched by the university's Rotaract Club.
The students were part of a group of 30 who were in the central Vietnamese city of Hue for the fourth edition of Project Phoniksa, launched by the university's Rotaract Club.PHOTO: PROJECTPHONIKSA/INSTAGRAM

SINGAPORE - All 20 Singapore Management University (SMU) students who were injured in a bus accident during a community service project trip to Vietnam last Saturday (May 11) have safely returned home.

Four had to come back by air ambulance.

Two of the four students - one suffering a hip fracture and the other a leg fracture - arrived home on Tuesday. The other two had returned on Monday. One had a neck injury and the other a leg fracture.

All four are in stable condition, and are currently being treated in hospital.

The students were part of a group of 30 who were in the central Vietnamese city of Hue for the fourth edition of Project Phoniksa, launched by the university's Rotaract Club.

One of the two buses that were ferrying the students hit a road kerb and all 20 students on board were flung from their seats.

Some of the those who escaped injury elected to extend their stay in Vietnam to assist and support their peers.

 

They have all since returned to Singapore.

"The students have been absolutely amazing," said SMU Provost Professor Timothy Clark. "When the first bus had the accident, those in the bus behind it immediately went to assist their peers. Over the last few days, they've been helping their fellow students through all the medical processes, so we're very grateful to them for the fantastic support they've shown."

He, along with university staff, counsellors, and medical doctors, met with the students and their parents at the airport upon their arrival.

"We're conscious that, apart from the physical injuries, some students would be quite traumatised by the experience, and some of their symptoms may take more time to manifest," said Prof Clark. The university will offer counselling to those who need it.

SMU said the local authorities had not concluded their investigation into the accident.