Perdaus expands its Choa Chu Kang childcare centre to include infantcare

The Iyad Perdaus childcare centre's services now include infantcare for children up to age three. Previously, it catered to children aged three to six only.
The Iyad Perdaus childcare centre's services now include infantcare for children up to age three. Previously, it catered to children aged three to six only.ST PHOTO: NG SOR LUAN

SINGAPORE - Muslim voluntary welfare organisation Perdaus has expanded its existing childcare centre in Choa Chu Kang to meet rising demand from residents.

Following the expansion of two wings, the Iyad Perdaus childcare centre is now able to serve up to 172 children, up from its previous capacity of 90 children.

The centre has also expanded its services to cater to a wider age group.

Its services now include infantcare for children up to age three. Previously, it catered to children aged three to six only.

"There are over 300 children on the waiting list for our Choa Chu Kang centre. Demand for our services has outstripped supply," said head of Iyad Perdaus Zaiton Mohd Ali.

She added that the demand is mostly from dual-income households where both parents work.

The centre, which has increased its pool of teachers from 12 to more than 20, also caters to children with special needs under the Integrated Child Care Programme.

Children of all races and religions are accepted in the centre, as it adopts the mainstream childcare curriculum.

Classes are conducted in English, and the centre offers Malay as Mother Tongue. Plans are also underway to add Mandarin as an enrichment class in future.

 
 
 

The other two Iyad Perdaus childcare centres are in Jurong East and Hougang.

Minister of State for Manpower and National Development Zaqy Mohamad, who officiated the expansion launch on Monday (Dec 16) morning, praised Iyad Perdaus for its varied services and inclusivity.

Highlighting the importance of quality childcare, he said childcare exposure will allow children to benefit from social engagement and the inculcating of values.

"It is also good for the younger community to interact with someone else with special needs. That creates a bond and gives confidence (to all the children)," he added.

Perdaus president Safarin Amerudin said the expansion will allow the organisation to extend its services to more people.

"This expansion (will bring)... a renewed sense of vigour and courage to extend our services to more in the community, catering to all children of different races, religions and abilities."