Should you worry if your kid is smaller than his peers?

Knowing how to assess that may allay parents' fears over their kids' size, allow them to seek help if needed

If a child is significantly bigger (or smaller) than his or her peers, the parents inevitably worry that he or she is overweight (or underweight). This can lead to inappropriate restrictions on food intake or overfeeding.
If a child is significantly bigger (or smaller) than his or her peers, the parents inevitably worry that he or she is overweight (or underweight). This can lead to inappropriate restrictions on food intake or overfeeding.ST FILE PHOTO

Many parents think they know how to spot obesity, yet they easily fail to notice it in their own children.

However, if their child is significantly bigger (or smaller) than his peers, they inevitably worry that he is overweight (or underweight). This can lead to inappropriate restrictions on food intake or overfeeding.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on October 02, 2018, with the headline 'Parents would do well to monitor their kids' growth'. Subscribe