Over 300 scientists from around the world to gather in Singapore

Professor Klaus von Klitzing, winner of the 1985 Nobel Prize in physics, speaking at a 2018 conference in Versailles, France. He will be one of 17 award-winning speakers at next week's Global Young Scientists Summit in Singapore. PHOTO: EPA-EFE
Professor Klaus von Klitzing, winner of the 1985 Nobel Prize in physics, speaking at a 2018 conference in Versailles, France. He will be one of 17 award-winning speakers at next week's Global Young Scientists Summit in Singapore. PHOTO: EPA-EFE

The eighth edition of the annual Global Young Scientists Summit (GYSS) welcomes one of its largest groups of young scientists yet, numbering 320. The summit will give them a chance to interact with 17 prominent leaders in science and technology.

The 17 award-winning speakers from a wide variety of research fields will gather in Singapore from across the world. They include recipients of the Nobel Prize as well as other prestigious science and technology awards.

Organised by the National Research Foundation Singapore, GYSS 2020 will be held at the Matrix building at Biopolis from next Tuesday to Friday.

The theme is Advancing Science, Creating Technologies For A Better World.

The scientists will share their knowledge and experience through plenary lectures, panel discussions and interactive group sessions.

Topics to be discussed include how research can develop solutions to current global challenges, from growing antibiotic resistance to a looming shortage in data storage capacity.

The young scientists can also visit universities and research institutions in Singapore to better understand how science and technology solutions are being developed to meet national challenges.

Among the highlights of the summit is that it will have Professor Alain Fischer, chair of experimental medicine at the College de France in Paris, as its special guest speaker.

He was one of the first scientists to successfully use gene therapy to treat a rare form of severe combined immunodeficiency, also known as the "bubble boy disease", named after a patient who lived for years in a plastic bubble filled with filtered air.

Mr Ashish Rauniyar, a PhD research fellow at Oslo Metropolitan University, will be attending GYSS 2020. He said that he is looking forward to meeting talented young researchers from around the world and engaging with the speakers.

"The opportunity to talk to them about their scientific experiences is an amazing opportunity," he added.

Members of the public will not miss out either, as they can hear from two speakers at two free public lectures. One will be held at the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD), and the other at the National University of Singapore (NUS).

At SUTD next Tuesday, the public can listen to a talk by the winner of the 1985 Nobel Prize in physics, Professor Klaus von Klitzing, about how physics has contributed to the realisation of a new International System of Units.

And at NUS next Thursday, Turing Award winner Leslie Lamport will give a talk entitled "If you're not writing a program, don't use programming language".

Dr Lamport won the Turing Award, regarded as the Nobel Prize of computing, in 2013.

To sign up or learn more about the two lectures, go to www.nrf.gov.sg/gyss/programme/ public-lectures

There are limited seats available, and Dr Lamport's lecture at NUS has already hit the maximum number of registrations.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 11, 2020, with the headline 'Over 300 scientists from around the world to gather in Singapore'. Print Edition | Subscribe