Online article on digital currency trading passing off as ST report is fake

The page, which mirrors The Straits Times's website, displays a story about local TV actor Shaun Chen ending his career to focus on trading in digital currencies.
The page, which mirrors The Straits Times's website, displays a story about local TV actor Shaun Chen ending his career to focus on trading in digital currencies. PHOTO: SCREENGRAB FROM TECHNOLTODAY.COM

SINGAPORE - A fake news article on digital currency trading passing off as a report by The Straits Times has been making its round online.

The page, which mirrors ST's website, displays a story about local TV actor Shaun Chen ending his career to focus on trading in digital currencies. It includes ST's logo and the section tabs found on the authentic website.

Clicking on any of the tabs on the fake webpage leads the user to pages with various clickbait articles and advertisements.

Facebook user Keith Lim alerted ST to the presence of the fake page through a message in the ST Facebook inbox.

Reader Ang Chiah Sin too alerted ST via e-mail and said the fake article appeared as a sponsored post when she was reading a different story on Facebook.

"Looking at the link, I highly doubted it is a Straits Times news report," she said, referring to the url of the page that had no mention of ST.

Other ways to make out that the page is passing off as an ST page is by looking at the caption, which is unrelated to the text of the article. There is also no photo credit. All photos on the ST site comes with a photo credit.



There is no photo credit on the page passing off as The Straits Times' website. PHOTO: SCREENGRAB FROM TECHNOLTODAY.COM

ST is aware of the existence of the fake page and is working to resolve the issue.

A similar case occurred last month when an advertising scam bearing Singapore billionaire Peter Lim's name surfaced.

 

The scam featured an advertisement claimed to be written by "Straits Times" and promoted a "new secret investment" endorsed by Mr Lim which had "experts in awe".

A representative for Mr Lim said he lodged a police report over the advertisement.

These false endorsements are typically the work of crime gangs, bitcoin experts have previously said.

Readers who see suspected fake sites mirroring the ST website are welcome to alert via Facebook or send an e-mail to stnewsdesk@sph.com.sg