New surgical tech a boon for haemorrhagic stroke patients

National Neuroscience Institute neurosurgery research director Nicolas Kon with a BrainPath obturator (blue) inside a sheath (transparent) and a model of the brain. It took him a year of trying before he succeeded in bringing the method to Singapore.
National Neuroscience Institute neurosurgery research director Nicolas Kon with a BrainPath obturator (blue) inside a sheath (transparent) and a model of the brain. It took him a year of trying before he succeeded in bringing the method to Singapore.ST PHOTO: GAVIN FOO
Mr Anindya Mitra and his wife Sumedha on Valentine's Day in Kolkata this year. Since his haemorrhagic stroke in Singapore last July, he has started playing the piano again and, with the help of physiotherapy, is walking as well. He has recovered well
Mr Anindya Mitra and his wife Sumedha on Valentine's Day in Kolkata this year. Since his haemorrhagic stroke in Singapore last July, he has started playing the piano again and, with the help of physiotherapy, is walking as well. He has recovered well, thanks to the BrainPath method.PHOTO: BEDASHRUTI MITRA BASU

It allows brain access via keyhole surgery and avoids cutting to remove blood clot

One minute he was in the bathroom and getting ready to go out, and the next, his family found him lying in the bathtub conscious but unable to speak.

Mr Anindya Mitra, 68, was in Singapore visiting his daughter last July when he suffered the deadliest, most debilitating form of stroke - haemorrhagic stroke, which happens when blood floods in or around the brain and creates swelling and pressure.

Please or to continue reading the full article. Learn more about ST PREMIUM.

Enjoy unlimited access to ST's best work

  • Exclusive stories and features on multiple devices
  • In-depth analyses and opinion pieces
  • ePaper and award-winning multimedia content
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on February 23, 2019, with the headline 'New surgical tech a boon for haemorrhagic stroke patients'. Print Edition | Subscribe