New life for old Traffic Police headquarters

Far left: (From left) Mr Ho Weng Hin, Mr Han Kok Juan and Mr Mok Wei Wei in one of the building's courtyards. Refurbishment work included reinstating the neutral tones of the building facade (above) and constructing an overhead link bridge (left).
(From left) Mr Ho Weng Hin, Mr Han Kok Juan and Mr Mok Wei Wei in one of the building's courtyards. ST PHOTO: GIN TAY
Far left: (From left) Mr Ho Weng Hin, Mr Han Kok Juan and Mr Mok Wei Wei in one of the building's courtyards. Refurbishment work included reinstating the neutral tones of the building facade (above) and constructing an overhead link bridge (left).
Refurbishment work included reinstating the neutral tones of the building facade (above) and constructing an overhead link bridge.ST PHOTO: GIN TAY
Far left: (From left) Mr Ho Weng Hin, Mr Han Kok Juan and Mr Mok Wei Wei in one of the building's courtyards. Refurbishment work included reinstating the neutral tones of the building facade (above) and constructing an overhead link bridge (left).
Refurbishment work included reinstating the neutral tones of the building facade and constructing an overhead link bridge (above).ST PHOTO: GIN TAY

Refurbishment of building, part of new dispute resolution complex, completed

It was not the front facade of the old Traffic Police headquarters in Maxwell Road that piqued heritage conservation expert Ho Weng Hin's interest during refurbishment efforts. Rather, it was the building's rear.

For 72 years until 1999, that was where the communal kitchens for the Traffic Police officers and their families were located. As a safety precaution in case of a stove fire, each of the windows was designed to be smaller than usual, located higher on the walls, and sheltered with a canopy hood.

"The building was actually an urban kampung of sorts. These features are a testimony to the fact that the building was not just an office, but also a living space," said Mr Ho, a partner at Studio Lapis, who directed the building's restoration works with Mr Mok Wei Wei, managing director of W Architects.

To pay homage to the 90-year-old building's heritage, the canopy hoods of the windows on its rear facade were restored using plastering techniques developed in the post-war years, he added.

The $25 million refurbishment of the building at 28 Maxwell Road into Maxwell Chambers Suites took nearly two years to complete.

Adjacent to Maxwell Chambers, a dispute resolution complex, the restored building will add about 120,000 sq ft of floor space to help meet growing demand for such services in Asia.

It will house at least 11 international institutions as well as 20 disputes chambers and practices from 11 countries, said the Ministry of Law during a media preview of the premises yesterday, ahead of its official opening on Aug 8.

  • $25m

    Cost of refurbishment of the building at 28 Maxwell Road into Maxwell Chambers Suites

    2

    Nearly this number of years to complete the restoration

Among the international institutions, five will be locating their case management offices at Maxwell Chambers Suites, which will create the highest concentration of case management offices in the world.

So far, some 75 per cent of the new office space has been taken up by tenants, said the Deputy Secretary at the Law Ministry, Mr Han Kok Juan, who headed a committee on the refurbishment efforts.

For the design team, the main challenge was to modernise the building without losing the character of its humble origins as living quarters for Traffic Police officers and their families, said Mr Mok.

"We did not want to over-glamorise the building, but to keep it understated," he noted.

Refurbishment efforts included reinstating the neutral tones of the building's facade to when it was used as the Traffic Police headquarters.

 
 

The building's four courtyards were also restored to their original setting in open air, by removing the concrete-slab roofs that were not part of the historic design but added later, for example, to house the Red Dot Design Museum.

A new overhead link bridge was also constructed to connect Maxwell Chambers and Maxwell Chambers Suites, while a 24-hour public passageway through the building from Maxwell Road to the Tanjong Pagar area will also be available.

At the media briefing yesterday, Mr Han said the opening of Maxwell Chambers Suites would boost Singapore's international standing as a dispute resolution hub.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on May 15, 2019, with the headline 'New life for old Traffic Police headquarters'. Print Edition | Subscribe