Naturalised Singaporean businessman to be stripped of citizenship: MHA

Mr Lan Shili, who was born in China and took the name Mick Davies in 2014, was deemed "not conducive to the public good" by the Ministry, which also stated that it would deprive him of his citizenship.
Mr Lan Shili, who was born in China and took the name Mick Davies in 2014, was deemed "not conducive to the public good" by the Ministry, which also stated that it would deprive him of his citizenship.PHOTO: ST FILE

SINGAPORE - A businessman ranked the 70th richest man in China in 2007 is to have his Singaporean citizenship revoked after flouting immigration laws here and overseas, the Home Affairs Ministry said on Monday (March 5).

Mr Lan Shili, who was born in China and took the name Mick Davies in 2014, was deemed "not conducive to the public good" by the Ministry, which also stated that it would deprive him of his citizenship.

Davies, who obtained Singaporean citizenship in 2002, was imprisoned in China in 2010 for tax evasion. In 2016 he was also investigated by the Chinese authorities for fraud. Although his Singapore passport was impounded by Chinese authorities then, he fled the country and entered Vietnam illegally.

Davies, 58, falsely declared to the Singapore mission in Hanoi that he had lost his Singapore passport.

But when he was told that he would have to report to the Vietnamese authorities to explain how he had entered the country, he paid 55,000 yuan (S$11,336) to a Vietnamese woman for a Hong Kong passport in the name of Fu Ching, 36, who looked like him.

The woman also supplied a plane ticket to Singapore for a flight on July 12, 2016.

Although he entered the country, the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority uncovered the illegal entry two weeks later.

Davies was charged and sentenced to imprisonment for multiple immigration offences related to his entry into Singapore without valid travel documents.

Investigations revealed that Davies provided forged educational certificates to support his Singapore citizenship application in 2002 and he did not declare that he was a citizen of a third country.

The authorities ruled that Davies obtained his Singapore citizenship by fraudulent means, falsely represented his details and broke immigration laws both locally and overseas.

He may apply to have his case referred to a Citizenship Committee of Inquiry within 21 days of receiving the Notice of Proposed Deprivation of his citizenship.

The committee can submit a report to the Minister, who will then decide if he will proceed to strip Davies of his citizenship.