Public feedback sought on wages and job issues

People with feedback on wages and employment-related issues can submit their views to the National Wages Council (NWC), which is developing annual guidelines on these matters.
People with feedback on wages and employment-related issues can submit their views to the National Wages Council (NWC), which is developing annual guidelines on these matters.ST PHOTO: KUA CHEE SIONG

People with feedback on wages and employment-related issues can submit their views to the National Wages Council (NWC), which is developing annual guidelines on these matters.

The council, which comprises representatives from employer groups, unions and the Government, will meet during the next two months to develop the guidelines.

Feedback should be sent by April 15 for the NWC to consider in its deliberations.

DBS chairman Peter Seah has chaired the council since 2015.

In its deliberations on wage recommendations, the council considers factors such as Singapore's economic performance as well as the domestic and global economic outlook, the Manpower Ministry said in a media statement yesterday.

Singapore's economic competitiveness, labour market conditions, inflation and productivity growth are also taken into account, it added.

Last year, the NWC raised the basic monthly pay threshold for low-wage workers it gives quantitative guidelines for to $1,300, up from $1,200. The council also recommended that this group be given built-in wage increments of between $50 and $70.

  • HOW TO DO IT

  • • Feedback can be sent by e-mail to the council's secretariat at nwc_secretariat@mom.gov.sg

    • It can also be mailed to: National Wages Council, c/o Manpower Planning and Policy Division, 18 Havelock Road #07-01 Singapore 059764

    • The fax number is 6534-4840.

It also proposed - for the first time - that companies with productivity gains in the previous year give these workers a one-off bonus of between $300 and $600. These payments can either be in a lump sum or over several payments.

For other workers, the council did not specify an amount or proportion for the bonus.

The guidelines came after healthy growth in the Singapore economy of 3.6 per cent in 2017. Labour productivity, measured as real value added per worker, also rose 4.1 per cent that year.

Last year, Singapore's economy grew 3.2 per cent, and labour productivity 2.5 per cent.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 26, 2019, with the headline 'Public feedback sought on wages and job issues'. Print Edition | Subscribe