Key questions on settling maritime disputes

Tanjung Bin Power Plant and part of the Port of Tanjung Pelepas, a container terminal in Johor Baru, as viewed from Tuas West Drive. The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea governs all aspects of how the world's seas and oceans, and their
Tanjung Bin Power Plant and part of the Port of Tanjung Pelepas, a container terminal in Johor Baru, as viewed from Tuas West Drive. The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea governs all aspects of how the world's seas and oceans, and their resources, are used. Some 168 parties have ratified the convention - one of the few international agreements that nearly all countries abide by in practice.ST PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI

Options for resolving claims range from negotiations to compulsory settlement

Yesterday, Singapore's Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) said the Republic had filed a declaration under an international treaty to ensure that no signatory - including Singapore and its neighbours - unilaterally begins third-party arbitration or adjudication on maritime boundary disputes involving the Republic.

Singapore filed the declaration under Article 298(1)(a) of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (Unclos) on Wednesday. In case a settlement could not be achieved through negotiations, the parties would mutually agree on the forum where they would seek to resolve their dispute and the issues that were to be decided, a spokesman for MFA said.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on December 14, 2018, with the headline 'Key questions on settling maritime disputes'. Print Edition | Subscribe