1,200 new jobs in Jurong Innovation District over next 18 months

A worker at Sodick Singapore Techno Centre's manufacturing facility in Jurong. New industry guidelines for the safe set-up, operation and maintenance of additive manufacturing facilities were launched yesterday.
A worker at Sodick Singapore Techno Centre's manufacturing facility in Jurong on March 31, 2021.ST PHOTO: GAVIN FOO
Second Minister for Trade and Industry Tan See Leng during visit to Sodick Singapore Techno Centre in the Jurong Innovation District on March 31.
Second Minister for Trade and Industry Tan See Leng during visit to Sodick Singapore Techno Centre in the Jurong Innovation District on March 31.ST PHOTO: GAVIN FOO

SINGAPORE -  The Jurong Innovation District will create some 1,200 new jobs in industries such as advanced manufacturing, urban mobility and urban solutions over the next 18 months.

With another 3,300 jobs that are “relocated” when factories move their operations into the area, the district will account for a total of 4,500 jobs in that time period.

Urban and infrastructure consulting firm Surbana Jurong and manufacturing plant Shimano are among the companies that are moving into the Jurong Innovation District.

Second Minister for Trade and Industry Tan See Leng gave these details to the media on Wednesday morning (March 31), on the sidelines of a visit to Sodick Singapore Techno Centre located in the district.

The first phase of the 600ha Jurong Innovation District is expected to be completed around 2022. When it is fully developed, the advanced manufacturing hub will create over 95,000 new jobs.

During his visit, Dr Tan also launched a set of new industry guidelines for the safe set-up, operations and maintenance of additive manufacturing facilities.

The guidelines are laid out in technical reference 87 on “Safety of Additive Manufacturing Facilities”, developed by the Singapore Standards Council overseen by Enterprise Singapore.

One area it covers is how such facilities can manage hazardous materials such as fine metal powders, which can pose a health hazard to workers, and are also toxic to the environment. 

For example, Sodick’s additive manufacturing centre has a number of safety features that comply with the guidelines. 

There are anti-static mats placed around the machinery to catch any loose metal powder that may fall on the ground during use, to prevent accidental fires. 

There are also sticky mats at the exit to collect any powder on workers’ shoes so that they will not bring such residue out of the centre. 

Mr Daniel Tan, Sodick Singapore general manager, said the guidelines are important for ensuring the safety of staff.

“Staff are an important asset for companies. It is our responsibility to provide a safe and good environment for staff, and to also build up their strengths,” he said. 

The technical reference also recommends risk management systems that further support the safe use, handling and storage of metal powders and additive manufacturing equipment in a controlled environment. 

It also details the necessary safety measures to protect workers from direct exposure to metal powders, as well as high-power and high-heat energy sources and systems.


Second Minister for Trade and Industry Tan See Leng touring the Sodick Singapore Techno Centre’s manufacturing facility in Jurong, on March 31, 2021. ST PHOTO: GAVIN FOO

Dr Tan said these guidelines will contribute to positioning Singapore as a trusted manufacturing hub. 

“By developing these quality standards, and making sure that there is also industry-wide adoption, the entire international scene can see what we are doing - the type of emphasis that we are placing in making sure that quality is maintained and standards are very high.”

He added: “These guidelines will go a long way... JTC will work with the different agencies to encourage (companies) to look at these guidelines and adopt them, and we will also continue to develop other guidelines as the needs of the industry evolve.”