Interactive fun is just the tonic to teach kids about health and science

Pre-schoolers take part in activities during the launch of the new interactive exhibits at KidsSTOP.
Pre-schoolers take part in activities during the launch of the new interactive exhibits at KidsSTOP.ST PHOTO: SYAMIL SAPARI
Pre-schoolers take part in activities during the launch of the new interactive exhibits at KidsSTOP.
Pre-schoolers take part in activities during the launch of the new interactive exhibits at KidsSTOP.ST PHOTO: SYAMIL SAPARI
Pre-schoolers take part in activities during the launch of the new interactive exhibits at KidsSTOP.
Pre-schoolers take part in activities during the launch of the new interactive exhibits at KidsSTOP.ST PHOTO: SYAMIL SAPARI
Pre-schoolers take part in activities during the launch of the new interactive exhibits at KidsSTOP.
Pre-schoolers take part in activities during the launch of the new interactive exhibits at KidsSTOP.ST PHOTO: SYAMIL SAPARI
Parliamentary Secretary for the Ministry of Social and Family Development Low Yen Ling join the children in one of the activities.
Parliamentary Secretary for the Ministry of Social and Family Development Low Yen Ling join the children in one of the activities.ST PHOTO: SYAMIL SAPARI

SINGAPORE - Science is not supposed to be child's play but one look at the skeleton riding a bike at KidsSTOP on Monday (May 14) would have put paid to that notion.

Sally the skeleton was just one of the new interactive exhibits at Singapore's first science centre for kids aged 18 months to eight years old.

The exhibits, which aim to teach youngsters about healthy living in fun ways, were unveiled yesterday by Science Centre Singapore and the Health Promotion Board.

A group of pre-schoolers from My First Skool attended the launch and were quick to get right into the new exhibits at the Science Centre in Jurong East.

One of them was Cycle with Sally, where children can watch the movement of bones and joints as Sally the skeleton rides a bicycle.

And then there was My Healthy Plate, an interactive exhibit designed to highlight the importance of eating a balanced meal. After introducing children to the four food groups, the exhibit teaches them how to select foods to fill their plate and provides tips on making healthier eating choices.

The focus is not only on physical health. KidsSTOP's new story pods help children learn how to identify and manage the different emotions they face in school and at home.

Animations illustrate problems common to kids aged two to eight years and equip them with the knowledge to understand their emotions.

The interactive and physical nature of the exhibits can help engage children so that they can learn effectively, said Ms Tiffany Lim, principal of My First Skool at Blk 756 Jurong West 74.

"Children can engage with all their senses when they are learning. Due to how real the exhibits are, they are able to contextualise what they have learned in school," she added.

"Children learn through play."

The notion of learning through play was also supported by Ms Low Yen Ling, Senior Parliamentary Secretary, Ministry of Education and Ministry of Manpower and Mayor of South West CDC.

"KidsSTOP's highly interactive and fun activities give children opportunities to play and learn at the same time. It takes lessons out of the classroom and lets the children enter into new worlds. They learn hands-on, that what we eat, do and feel impacts our body and health," said Ms Low, who attended the opening.

The My First Skool kids said they enjoyed the interactive exhibits and expressed their interest in returning to KidsSTOP.