Hospital plants 50 trees in support of NParks' 1 million tree goal

Farrer Park Hospital’s tree planting session marks the first time a hospital in Singapore is supporting Garden City Fund’s Plant-A-Tree programme.
Farrer Park Hospital’s tree planting session marks the first time a hospital in Singapore is supporting Garden City Fund’s Plant-A-Tree programme.PHOTO: FARRER PARK HOSPITAL
Twenty-five volunteers were present for Farrer Park Hospital’s inaugural tree planting session.
Twenty-five volunteers were present for Farrer Park Hospital’s inaugural tree planting session.PHOTO: FARRER PARK HOSPITAL

SINGAPORE - Farrer Park Hospital became the first hospital here to support the national Plant-A-Tree programme on Friday (March 12).

A total of 50 trees were planted at Sungei Serangoon Park Connector by 25 volunteers, who included pioneer staff of Farrer Park Hospital and specialists from Farrer Park Medical Centre. Hospital staff donated $15,000 towards this effort.

Held in conjunction with the hospital's 5th anniversary, the session was part of the charity Garden City Fund's Plant-A-Tree Programme for organisations and people to participate in the greening of Singapore.

The effort contributes to the National Parks Board's (NParks) target of planting one million trees across the island by 2030.

Five different species of hardy trees suitable to the tropical climate were selected by NParks for the tree-planting site, including the critically endangered Cratoxylum maingayi tree, better known locally as white mempat, that produces reddish leaves and ornamental pink blossoms.

Dr Peng Chung Mien, chief executive of Farrer Park Hospital, said: "Sustainability has always been in our roots...

"With increased urbanisation, it is heartening to know that there are more ways than ever for us to restore nature in our Lion City, but what is most encouraging is knowing that our heart for sustainability aligns with Singapore's goal to transform into a city in nature and to contribute to global sustainability efforts."

The tree planting session is part of Farrer Park Hospital's efforts to go green and reduce its carbon footprint, which includes building 15 gardens.

More solar panels will also be installed on top of the hospital, said Dr Peng.

"This would allow us to utilise power generated on our rooftop, which means we could rely less on fossil fuels that cause air pollution, and slow down the overall greenhouse effect on Earth," he added.


Volunteers helped to dig holes and water the trees they planted. PHOTO: FARRER PARK HOSPITAL