Honey, I shrank the Eiffel Tower

SUTD team's work in nanostructures could help in preventing counterfeiting

An optical micrograph (left) and a scanning electron micrograph 3D image of the Chinese character for “good luck”.
An optical micrograph (left) and a scanning electron micrograph 3D image of the Chinese character for “good luck”. PHOTOS: SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY AND DESIGN
A multi-coloured 3D print of the Eiffel Tower, fabricated using the heat-induced shrinking method.
A multi-coloured 3D print of the Eiffel Tower, fabricated using the heat-induced shrinking method. PHOTOS: SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY AND DESIGN
A multi-coloured 3D print of the Eiffel Tower, fabricated using the heat-induced shrinking method.
A multi-coloured 3D print of the Eiffel Tower, fabricated using the heat-induced shrinking method. PHOTOS: SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY AND DESIGN
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Underneath a microscope in the corner of a laboratory in Upper Changi sits a model of the Eiffel Tower no wider than a strand of human hair, and about 10 million times shorter than the actual monument in Paris.

The vibrantly coloured mini-monument is the result of two years of research led by Associate Professor Joel Yang from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD).

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 25, 2020, with the headline Honey, I shrank the Eiffel Tower. Subscribe