SFA asks Abbott to recall Alimentum infant formula over possible presence of bacteria

The Singapore Food Agency said that parents or caregivers should stop using the product, which originated from the United States. PHOTO: SINGAPORE FOOD AGENCY/FACEBOOK

SINGAPORE - Certain batches of the Alimentum powdered infant formula, made by Abbott Nutrition in the United States, are being recalled in Singapore due to a possible presence of pathogenic bacteria.

The Singapore Food Agency (SFA) said on Saturday (Feb 19) that parents or caregivers should stop using the product.

They should seek medical assistance if their infants feel unwell after consuming the product.

SFA said the affected batches have codes in which the first two digits are "22" up to "37". It added that the code on the affected containers contains "K8", "SH" or "Z2".

The affected batches have an expiration date of April 1, 2022, or later.

The SFA has directed Abbott Laboratories in Singapore to recall the affected batches, and the process is ongoing.

SFA added that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a notice that it is working with Abbott Nutrition to initiate a voluntary recall of the Alimentum powdered infant formula in the US due to the possible presence of Cronobacter sakazakii and salmonella Newport, which are pathogenic bacteria.

Cronobacter sakazakii, which can survive in dry conditions such as in powdered infant formula, can cause meningitis or sepsis.

Symptoms displayed by infected infants include fever, poor feeding or lethargy.

Salmonella Newport can cause gastrointestinal illness and those infected may experience fever, abdominal cramps and diarrhoea.

The FDA said it is investigating complaints in three US states involving four infants who fell ill.

All four cases were hospitalised and the presence of Cronobacter sakazakii may have contributed to a death in one case, added the FDA.

Consumers here can contact the retailer that they bought the product from to find out more.

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