War on diabetes: An inside look

How buyers can be duped by food labels

Marketing buzzwords may lead consumers to over-infer nutritional value of an item

Experts say consumers should carefully read nutrition information instead of relying on tags like "diabetic", "sugar free" or "organic".
Experts say consumers should carefully read nutrition information instead of relying on tags like "diabetic", "sugar free" or "organic".PHOTO: ISTOCKPHOTO

Pick up a supermarket granola bar, and chances are its packaging will feature wholesome grains, fresh fruit, or a label emphasising that it is made with "real" ingredients.

But its nutrition label probably tells a different story. In fact, the United States Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee classifies granola as a "grain-based dessert" in the same category as cakes, donuts and cookies.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 26, 2018, with the headline 'How buyers can be duped by food labels'. Subscribe