Dangers of second-hand smoke

Research has shown that second-hand smoke could lead to breast cancer, chronic and acute respiratory symptoms, and impaired lung function.
Research has shown that second-hand smoke could lead to breast cancer, chronic and acute respiratory symptoms, and impaired lung function.

Although less than 15 per cent of people here are smokers, no one is immune to the dangers of second-hand smoke, according to medical experts.

Dr Madeleine Chew, a general practitioner at MW Medical, told The Sunday Times that second-hand smoke can be dangerous for infants. It can trigger a host of diseases and harmful conditions including asthma attacks, ear infections, bronchitis, pneumonia, coughing and sneezing.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on September 16, 2018, with the headline 'Dangers of second-hand smoke'. Print Edition | Subscribe